Luke 19:45
Traders Driven from the Temple

      45Jesus entered the temple and began to drive out those who were selling, 46saying to them, “It is written, ‘AND MY HOUSE SHALL BE A HOUSE OF PRAYER,’ but you have made it a ROBBERSDEN.”

      47And He was teaching daily in the temple; but the chief priests and the scribes and the leading men among the people were trying to destroy Him, 48and they could not find anything that they might do, for all the people were hanging on to every word He said.

NASB ©1995

Parallel Verses
American Standard Version
And he entered into the temple, and began to cast out them that sold,

Douay-Rheims Bible
And entering into the temple, he began to cast out them that sold therein, and them that bought.

Darby Bible Translation
And entering into the temple, he began to cast out those that sold and bought in it,

English Revised Version
And he entered into the temple, and began to cast out them that sold,

Webster's Bible Translation
And he went into the temple, and began to cast out them that sold in it, and them that bought,

Weymouth New Testament
Then Jesus entered the Temple and proceeded to drive out the dealers.

World English Bible
He entered into the temple, and began to drive out those who bought and sold in it,

Young's Literal Translation
And having entered into the temple, he began to cast forth those selling in it, and those buying,
August 31 Evening
Occupy till I come.--LUKE 19:13. The Son of man is as a man taking a far journey, who left his house, and gave authority to his servants, and to every man his work, and commanded the porter to watch.--Unto one he gave five talents, to another two, and to another one; to every man according to his several ability; and straightway took his journey. I must work the works of him that sent me, while it is day: the night cometh, when no man can work.--Wist ye not that I must be about my Father's business?--Leaving
Anonymous—Daily Light on the Daily Path

October 28. "Thou Good Servant, Because Thou Hast Been Faithful in a Very Little, have Thou Authority Over Ten Cities" (Luke xix. 17).
"Thou good servant, because thou hast been faithful in a very little, have thou authority over ten cities" (Luke xix. 17). It is not our success in service that counts, but our fidelity. Caleb and Joshua were faithful and God remembered it when the day of visitation came. It was a very difficult and unpopular position, and all of us are called in the crisis of our lives to stand alone and in this very matter of trusting God for victory over sin and our full inheritance in Christ we have all to be
Rev. A. B. Simpson—Days of Heaven Upon Earth

The Kingdom of Christ
LUKE xix. 41. And when he was come near, he beheld the city, and wept over it. Let us think awhile what was meant by our Lord's weeping over Jerusalem. We ought to learn thereby somewhat more of our Lord's character, and of our Lord's government. Why did he weep over that city whose people would, in a few days, mock him, scourge him, crucify him, and so fill up the measure of their own iniquity? Had Jesus been like too many, who since his time have fancied themselves saints and prophets, would
Charles Kingsley—Discipline and Other Sermons

Melted by Kindness
'And when Jesus came to the place, He looked up, and saw him, and said unto him, Zacchaeus, make haste, and come down; for to-day I must abide at thy house.' --LUKE xix. 5. It is characteristic of Luke that only he tells the story of Zacchaeus. He always dwells with special interest on incidents bringing out the character of Christ as the Friend of outcasts. His is eminently the Gospel of forgiveness. For example, we owe to Him the three supreme parables of the lost sheep, the lost coin, and the
Alexander Maclaren—Expositions Of Holy Scripture

The Trading Servants
'Then came the first, saying, Lord, thy pound hath gained ten pounds.... And the second came, saying, Lord, thy pound hath gained five pounds.' --LUKE xix.16, 18. The Evangelist, contrary to his usual practice, tells us what was the occasion of this parable. It was spoken at Jericho, on our Lord's last journey to Jerusalem, Bethany was but a day's march distant; Calvary but a week ahead. An unusual tension of spirit marked our Lord's demeanour, and was noticed by the disciples with awe. It infected
Alexander Maclaren—Expositions Of Holy Scripture

The Rewards of the Trading Servants
'Because thou hast been faithful in a very little, have thou authority over ten cities... Be thou also over five cities.'--LUKE xix. 17, 19. The relation between this parable of the pounds and the other of the talents has often been misunderstood, and is very noteworthy. They are not two editions of one parable variously manipulated by the Evangelists, but they are two parables presenting two kindred and yet diverse aspects of one truth. They are neither identical, as some have supposed, nor contradictory,
Alexander Maclaren—Expositions Of Holy Scripture

A New Kind of King
'And when He was come nigh, even now at the descent of the mount of Olives, the whole multitude of the disciples began to rejoice and praise God with a loud voice for all the mighty works that they had seen; 38. Saying, Blessed be the King that cometh in the name of the Lord: peace in heaven, and glory in the highest. 38. And some of the Pharisees from among the multitude said unto Him, Master, rebuke Thy disciples. 40. And He answered and said unto them, I tell you that, if these should hold their
Alexander Maclaren—Expositions Of Holy Scripture

December the Eighteenth the Sinner's Guest
"He is gone to be guest with a man that is a sinner." --LUKE xix. 1-10. It was hurled as an accusation; it has been treasured as a garland. It was first said in contempt; it is repeated in adoration. It was thought to reveal His earthliness; it is now seen to unveil His glory. Our Saviour seeks the home of the sinner. The Best desires to be the guest of the worst. He spreads His kindnesses for the outcasts, and He offers His friendship to the exile on the loneliest road. He waits to befriend the
John Henry Jowett—My Daily Meditation for the Circling Year

August the Twenty-Sixth Missing the Lord
"Thou knowest not the time of thy visitation." --LUKE xix. 37-44. Yes, that has been my sad experience. I have wasted some of my wealthiest seasons. I have treated the hour as common and worthless, and the priceless opportunity has passed. There have been times when my Lord has come to me, and I have turned Him away from my door. He so often journeys "incognito," and if I am thoughtless I dismiss Him, and so lose the privilege of heavenly communion and benediction. He knocks at my door as a Carpenter,
John Henry Jowett—My Daily Meditation for the Circling Year

Effectual Calling
1. Now, first, effectual calling is a very gracious truth. You may guess this from the fact that Zaccheus was a character whom we should suppose the last to be saved. He belonged to a bad city--Jericho--a city which had been cursed, and no one would suspect that any one would come out of Jericho to be saved. It was near Jericho that the man fell among thieves; we trust Zaccheus had no hand in it; but there are some who, while they are publicans, can be thieves also. We might as well expect converts
Charles Haddon Spurgeon—Spurgeon's Sermons Volume 2: 1856

The Mission of the Son of Man
Our text announces as a declaration of our Saviour, that he, the Son of Man, is come to seek and to save that which was lost. In addressing you this morning, I shall simply divide my discourse thus:--First, I shall lay it down as a selfevident truth, that whatever was the intention of Christ in his coming into the world that intention most certainly shall never be frustrated. We shall then in the second place, look into the intention of Christ, as announced in the text, viz., "to seek and to save
Charles Haddon Spurgeon—Spurgeon's Sermons Volume 4: 1858

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