Jude 1:24
Now to him that is able to keep you from falling, and to present you faultless before the presence of his glory with exceeding joy,
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EXPOSITORY (ENGLISH BIBLE)
(24, 25) Concluding Doxology.

(24) Now unto him that is able.—Comp. the conclusion Romans 16:25. It would be rash to infer from the similarity that St. Jude must have known the Epistle to the Romans; although there is nothing incredible in the supposition that he was acquainted with it. The Epistle had been in circulation probably for some ten years before St. Jude wrote. Doxologies no doubt became elastic formulas almost from the first.

To keep you from falling.—Better, to keep you unfallen. From his own warnings, denunciations, and exhortations, which have been severe and sombre throughout, St. Jude turns in joyous, exulting confidence to Him who alone can make them effectual. “Keep you,” or, guard you: not the more general word translated “preserved” in Jude 1:1, but another more in harmony with the present context, as indicating protection against the great perils just pointed out. A reading of much authority has “them” for “you”—to keep them unfallen. If it be correct, it may be explained as being in thought, though not in form, addressed to God, so that those to whom he is writing are spoken of in the third person.

Before the presence of his glory.—The glory that shall be revealed at the day of judgment. The meaning is, “Who can bring it to pass that you stand blameless before the judgment-seat” (Colossians 1:22; 1Thessalonians 3:13).

(25) To the only wise God our Saviour.—The coupling of “Saviour” with “God” is common in the Pastoral Epistles (1Timothy 1:1; 1Timothy 2:3; Titus 1:3; Titus 2:10; Titus 3:4). “Wise” must be omitted as wanting in authority. (See Note on Romans 16:27.) Doxologies became well-known forms with many variations: changes to something more familiar to the copyist might easily be made in transcribing.

After “Saviour” must be inserted, on the highest MS. authority, “through Jesus Christ our Lord.” Wiclif and the Rhemish have the missing clause.

Glory and majesty, dominion and power. Omit the first “and.” “Glory” and “dominion” are frequent in the New Testament doxologies: the Greek words represented by “majesty” and “power” occur here only. After “power” we must supply, on overwhelming authority, “before all time.” Consequently “is” may be substituted for “be” before “glory;” but no verb is needed.

Both now and ever.—Better, and now and to all the ages; so that the whole will run thus: To the only God our Saviour, through Jesus Christ our Lord, glory, majesty, dominion, and power, before all time, and now, and to all the ages. Thus we have a most comprehensive phrase for eternity—before time, time, after time—and thus the three-fold arrangement runs through to the very end.

Amen.—Common ending of a doxology. (Romans 1:25; 1Peter 4:11; 2Peter 3:18.) These ungodly men may “despise dominion, and speak evil of dignities,” may utter “great swelling words” about their own knowledge and liberty, and scoff at those who walk not with them; but still, ages before they were born, and ages after they have ceased to be, glory, majesty, dominion, and power belong to Him who saves us, and would save even them, through Jesus Christ our Lord.

Jude 1:24-25. Now unto him who alone is able to keep you from falling — Into any of these errors or sins, or from stumbling, as απταιστους literally signifies, rugged and dangerous as the ways of life are, and feeble as you know yourselves to be; and at length to present you faultless — Fully sanctified and conformed to the image of God’s Son; see on Colossians 1:22; before the presence of his glory — That is, in his own presence, when he shall be revealed in all his glory; with exceeding joy — With joy, great and unutterable. To the only wise God, now become our Saviour — That is, our Deliverer from the guilt and power of sin and its consequences, our Restorer to the enjoyment of the blessings lost by the fall, and our Preserver to eternal life. Or, as Macknight reads the clause, To the wise God alone. See on Romans 16:27. Be glory, &c. — That is, the glory of infinite perfection; and the majesty — Of empire absolutely universal; dominion — Or strength, as κρατος may be properly rendered, namely, to govern that empire; and power Εξουσια, authority, or right to do whatever seemeth to himself good; both now and ever — Εις παντας τους αιωνας, throughout all ages, or both now and throughout all eternity. “From the appellation here used, our Saviour, it is argued by some that this doxology is addressed to the Lord Jesus, whose proper title is our Saviour, and who is called God in other passages of Scripture, particularly Romans 9:5, where he is styled, God blessed for ever. Nevertheless, as in some passages of Scripture, particularly Luke 1:47; 1 Timothy 1:1; Titus 1:3, the Father is styled our Saviour, this argument is doubtful. They who contend that the doxology in this passage belongs to the Father, observe that the same doxology is unambiguously addressed to God the Father, Romans 16:27,” to which passage we have just referred the reader. 1:24,25 God is able, and as willing as able, to keep us from falling, and to present us faultless before the presence of his glory. Not as those who never have been faulty, but as those who, but for God's mercy, and a Saviour's sufferings and merits, might most justly have been condemned long ago. All sincere believers were given him of the Father; and of all so given him he has lost none, nor will lose any one. Now, our faults fill us with fears, doubts, and sorrows; but the Redeemer has undertaken for his people, that they shall be presented faultless. Where there is no sin, there will be no sorrow; where there is the perfection of holiness, there will be the perfection of joy. Let us more often look up to Him who is able to keep us from falling, to improve as well as maintain the work he has wrought in us, till we shall be presented blameless before the presence of his glory. Then shall our hearts know a joy beyond what earth can afford; then shall God also rejoice over us, and the joy of our compassionate Saviour be completed. To Him who has so wisely formed the scheme, and will faithfully and perfectly accomplish it, be glory and majesty, dominion and power, both now and for ever. Amen.Now unto him that is able to keep you from falling - This ascription to one who was able to keep them from falling is made in view of the facts adverted to in the Epistle - the dangers of being led away by the arts and the example of these teachers of error. Compare Jde 1:3. On the ascription itself, compare the notes at Romans 16:25-27. The phrase "to keep from falling" means here to preserve from falling into sin, from yielding to temptation, and dishonoring their religion. The word used (ἀπταιστους aptaistous) occurs nowhere else in the New Testament. It means properly, "not stumbling" as of a horse; then "without falling into sin, blameless." It is God only who, amidst the temptations of the world, can keep us from falling; but, blessed be his name, he can do it, and if we trust in him he will.

And to present you faultless - The word here rendered "faultless" is the same which is rendered "unblamable" in Colossians 1:22. See the sentiment here expressed explained in the notes at that passage.

Before the presence of his glory - In his own glorious presence; before himself encompassed with glory in heaven. The saints are to be presented there as redeemed and sanctified, and as made worthy by grace to dwell there forever.

With exceeding joy - With the abounding joy that they are redeemed; that they are rescued from sorrow, sin, and death, and that heaven is to be their eternal home. Who now can form an adequate idea of the happiness of that hour?

24, 25. Concluding doxology.

Now—Greek, "But."

you—Alford, on inferior authority, reads, "them." You is in contradistinction to those ungodly men mentioned above.

keep … from falling—rather, "guard … (so as to be) without falling," or stumbling.

faultless—Greek, "blameless."

before the presence of his glory—that is, before Himself, when He shall be revealed in glory.

with exceeding joy—literally, "with exultation" as of those who leap for joy.

Able to keep you from falling; from stumbling in your spiritual course, and so able to make you persevere to the end.

Before the presence of his glory; or, his glorious presence, i.e. before himself, Ephesians 5:27. Having exhorted these saints to perseverance in the faith, he now tells them in whose strength they must stand, and to whom they are to give the glory of it. Now unto him that is able to keep you from falling,.... The people of God are liable to falling into temptation, into sin, into errors and mistakes, from an exercise of grace, or from a degree of steadfastness in Gospel truths, and even into a final and total apostasy, were it not for divine power; and they are not able to keep themselves. Adam, in his state of innocence, could not keep himself from falling; nor could the angels, many of whom fell, and the rest are preserved by the grace of God; wherefore, much less can imperfect sinful men keep themselves, they want both skill and power to do it; nor can any, short of Christ, keep them, and it is his work and office to preserve them; they were given to him with this view, and he undertook to do it; and sensible sinners commit themselves to him, as being appointed for that purpose; and this is a work Christ has been, and is, employed in, and he is every way qualified for it: he is "able" to do it, for he is the mighty God, the Creator and upholder of all things; and as Mediator, he has all power in heaven and in earth; instances of persons kept by him prove it; and there is such evidence of it, that believers may be, and are persuaded of it: and he is as willing as he is able; it is his Father's will he should keep them, and in that he delights; and as he has undertook to keep them, he is accountable for them; besides, he has an interest in them, and the greatest love and affection for them; to which may be added, that the glory of the Father, Son, and Spirit, in man's salvation, depends on the keeping of them: and what he keeps them from is, from falling by temptations, not from being tempted by Satan, but from sinking under his temptations, and from being devoured by him; and from falling by sin, not from the being or commission of sin, but from the dominion of it, and from the falling into it, so as to perish by it; and from falling into damnable heresies; and from the true grace of God, and into final impenitence, unbelief, and total apostasy. Instead of "you", the Alexandrian copy reads "us", and some copies "them":

and to present you faultless before the presence of his glory with exceeding joy; to himself, in this present state of things, as washed in his blood, and justified by his righteousness, and hereafter in the millennium state, and in the ultimate glory; and also to his Father, and this he died to do, and in some sense did it at his death, even in the body of his flesh, through death, and now as the representative of his people in heaven; and will at the last day, when he will deliver them up complete and perfect; all which is in consequence of his suretyship engagements: and this presentation is made "before the presence of his glory"; either before the glorious presence of Christ, or Christ himself, who is glorious, and will appear in glory, in his own, and in his Father's, and in his holy angels; or else before the glorious presence of God the Father, and who is glory itself: and the condition in which the saints are, and will be presented, is "faultless"; though they have sinned in Adam, and were so wretchedly guilty and filthy in their nature state, so prone to backslidings, and guilty of so many after conversion, and though a body of sin and death is carried by them to the grave; yet they will at last be presented by Christ in perfect holiness, in complete righteousness, and in the shining robes of immortality and, glory. The manner in which they will be presented is "with exceeding joy"; in themselves, for what they shall be delivered from, from sin and sorrow, and every enemy, and for the glory and happiness they shall then enjoy; and also in the ministers of the Gospel, who will then bring their sheaves with joy, and then will their converts be their joy and crown of rejoicing; and likewise this presentation will be with the joy of angels, for if they rejoice at the conversion of men, much more at their glorification; and even with the joy of Father, Son, and Spirit.

{14} Now unto him that is able to keep you from falling, and to present you faultless before the presence of his glory with exceeding joy,

(14) He commends them to the grace of God, declaring sufficiently that it is God only that can give us that constancy which he requires of us.

EXEGETICAL (ORIGINAL LANGUAGES)
Jude 1:24-25. CONCLUSION OF THE EPISTLE BY A DOXOLOGY.

Τῷ ΔῈ ΔΥΝΑΜΈΝῼ] THE SAME COMMENCEMENT OF THE DOXOLOGY IN Romans 16:27.

ὙΜᾶς] WERE ΑὐΤΟΎς THE CORRECT READING, WE COULD HARDLY DO OTHERWISE THAN REFER IT TO THE LAST-MENTIONED ΟὛς ΔΈ, TO WHICH IT IS UNSUITABLE, AS THEY ARE NOT ἌΠΤΑΙΣΤΟΙ, WHO, AS SUCH, REQUIRE ONLY ΦΥΛΆΣΣΕΙΝ. THAT JUDE ACTUALLY WROTE ΑὐΤΟΎς: “IN THE FLIGHT OF DEVOTION MAY HAVE TURNED FROM HIS READERS, AND SPOKE OF THEM IN THE THIRD PERSON” (DE WETTE), IS HIGHLY IMPROBABLE.

ἈΠΤΑΊΣΤΟΥς] ἍΠ. ΛΕΓ., LITERALLY, WHO STRIKES NOT AGAINST; THEN FIGURATIVELY, WHO STUMBLES NOT, DOES NOT OFFEND; HERE IN THE MORAL SENSE AS ΠΤΑΊΩ, Jam 2:10; Jam 3:2; VULGATE: SINE PECCATO.

ΚΑῚ ΣΤῆΣΑΙ ΚΑΤΕΝΏΠΙΟΝ Τῆς ΔΌΞΗς ΑὙΤΟῦ ἈΜῶΜΟΥς] SCHOTT CORRECTLY REMARKS ON ΚΑΊ: THE SECOND EFFECT IS THE ULTIMATE RESULT OF THE FIRST, SO THAT ΚΑΊ MIGHT BE RENDERED BY AND SO, AND ACCORDINGLY. ΔΌΞΑ IS HERE THE GLORY OF GOD, AS IT WILL BE MANIFESTED AT THE DAY OF JUDGMENT. ON ΣΤῆΣΑΙ ἈΜΏΜΟΥς, COMP. 1 Corinthians 1:8; Colossians 1:22; 1 Thessalonians 3:13. THE MEANING IS: “WHO CAN EFFECT IT THAT YE MAY APPEAR AS ἌΜΩΜΟΙ BEFORE HIS JUDGMENT-SEAT.”

ἘΝ ἈΓΑΛΛΙΆΣΕΙ] MENTIONS THE CONDITION IN WHICH CHRISTIANS WILL THEN BE FOUND; COMP. 1 Peter 4:13.

Jude 1:25. ΜΌΝῼ ΘΕῷ] SEE Jude 1:4; John 5:44; Romans 16:27; 1 Timothy 1:17.

ΣΩΤῆΡΙ ἩΜῶΝ] MARKS, IN CONNECTION WITH ΔΙᾺ ἸΗΣΟῦ ΧΡ., THE ESSENTIAL CHRISTIAN ELEMENT IN THE IDEA OF GOD; ON ΣΩΤΉΡ AS A DESIGNATION OF GOD, COMP. 1 Timothy 1:1. SCHOTT INCORRECTLY JOINS ΜΌΝῼ ΘΕῷ WITH ΣΩΤῆΡΙ ἩΜῶΝ, AS IF IT MEANT: “TO HIM WHO ALONE IS GOD, IN SUCH A MANNER THAT HE IS OUR SAVIOUR;” AND THE REASON WHICH HE ASSIGNS: “BECAUSE ΜΌΝΟς ΘΕΌς IS NEVER USED BY ITSELF, BUT ALWAYS OCCURS AS A DESIGNATION OF GOD RELATIVE TO OTHER ATTRIBUTES,” IS CONTRADICTED BY John 5:44; ALSO BY 1 Timothy 1:17 AND JUDE Jude 1:4.

ΔΙᾺ ἸΗΣ. ΧΡΙΣΤΟῦ] BELONGS TO ΣΩΤῆΡΙ ἩΜῶΝ (SCHOTT), NOT TO ΔΌΞΑ Κ.Τ.Λ. (WIESINGER); IN THIS LATTER CASE IT WOULD BE PUT AFTER ἘΞΟΥΣΊΑ.

ΔΌΞΑ, ΜΕΓΑΛΩΣΎΝΗ Κ.Τ.Λ.] ΔΌΞΑ AND ΚΡΆΤΟς OCCUR FREQUENTLY IN THE NEW TESTAMENT DOXOLOGIES (SEE 1 Peter 4:11); ΜΕΓΑΛΩΣΎΝΗ AND ἘΞΟΥΣΊΑ ONLY HERE; ΜΕΓΑΛΩΣΎΝΗ CORRESPONDS TO THE HEBREW גֹּדֶל, COMP. Deuteronomy 32:3, LXX.: ΔΌΤΕ ΜΕΓΑΛΩΣΎΝΗΝ Τῷ ΘΕῷ ἩΜῶΝ.

ΠΡῸ ΠΑΝΤῸς ΤΟῦ ΑἸῶΝΟς] BY THESE WORDS, WANTING IN THE REC., THE IDEA OF ETERNITY IS EXPRESSED IN THE MOST COMPREHENSIVE MANNER. NOT ἜΣΤΩ, BUT ἘΣΤΊ (DE WETTE, SCHOTT), IS TO BE SUPPLIED; COMP. 1 Peter 4:11.

ἈΜΉΝ] THE USUAL CONCLUSION OF DOXOLOGIES, AS IN Romans 1:15; 1 Peter 4:11, ETC.; IT STANDS IN THE EPISTLES TO THE GALATIANS AND HEBREWS, PROBABLY ALSO IN 2 PETER, AS HERE, AT THE END OF THE EPISTLE.Jude 1:24-25. Final Benediction and Ascription. I have bidden you to keep yourselves in the love of God; I have warned you against all impiety and impurity. But do not think that you can attain to the one, or guard yourselves from the other, in your own strength. You must receive power from above; and that it may be so, I offer up my prayer to Him, who alone is able to keep you from stumbling, and to present you before the throne of His glory, pure and spotless in exceeding joy. To Him, the only God and Saviour, belong glory, greatness, might, and authority throughout all ages.24. Now unto him that is able to keep you from falling] Better, able to keep you from stumbling. See note on the difference between “stumbling” and “falling,” on 2 Peter 1:10. The form of the concluding doxology is determined naturally by the thoughts that have led up to it. The writer had been dwelling on the various ways in which men had stumbled and fallen. He now directs their thoughts to God as alone able to preserve them from a like disastrous issue.

to present you faultless before the presence of his glory] The adjective is a favourite one with St Paul (Ephesians 1:4; Ephesians 5:27; Php 2:15; Colossians 1:22) as describing the character of believers. In Hebrews 9:14 and 1 Peter 1:19 it is used of the stainless purity of Christ. The “glory” spoken of is that which is to be manifested at the coming of Christ “in his own glory, and that of the Father, and of the Holy Angels” (Luke 9:26). Comp. also Titus 2:13.

with exceeding joy] Both adjective and substantive are expressed in Greek by the one word for “exulting joy” in Luke 1:14; Luke 1:44; Acts 2:46.Jude 1:24. Φυλάξαι αὐτοὺς ἀπταίστους, to keep you[11] free from stumbling) in contradistinction to those ungodly men. Αὐτοὺς, for ὑμᾶς, refers to the preceding announcements, as Matthew 23:37.—κατενώπιον τῆς δόξης αὐτοῦ, before the presence of His glory) before the presence of Himself, when He shall he revealed most gloriously.—ἀμώμους, without fault) in your own selves. This is antithetical to, free from stumbling.

[11] Why it is that both here and in the Germ. Vers. the pronoun αὐτοὺς has been translated by you (“euch”), this very note of the Gnomon indicates: to wit, the reading ὑμᾶς does not seem a probable one according to the decision of both Greek Ed.—E. B.

Αὐτοὺς is the reading of B (according to Tisch.) and Stephens’ Rec. Text. Ὑμᾶς, in C Vulg. and Elezev. Rec. Text. A has ἡμᾶς.—E.Verses 24, 25. - The Epistle closes with a doxology of a high and solemn strain, resembling in some respects that with which the Epistle to the Romans concludes, and couched in terms befitting what has just been said of danger and duty. Now unto him that is able to keep you from falling. The writer has counseled the readers to keep themselves in the love of God. He has also set before them the attitude they ought to adopt toward different classes, and has not concealed the peril to themselves which the discharge of Christian duty to others may involve. Recognizing how short the way is that brotherly counsel or personal effort can carry one in these solemn and arduous obligations, he now reminds his readers of a higher power that is available for their help and protection, and commends them to that as their best, their only security. The risk of falling or stumbling, as it rather means, is great. Only the omnipotence of God can "keep" them from it or protect them against it, the word for "keeping" being one which expresses the idea of "guarding." And to present you faultless before the presence of his glory with exceeding joy. The terms here again arc exceedingly vivid, the one which is rendered "present" meaning to "set one up" or "make one stand," and the "faultless" being the adjective "without blemish" which is applied to the Levitical offerings in the Old Testament, and to Christ himself in 1 Peter 1:19. The "glory" here in view is that of the last day, when he to whom all judgment is committed returns to execute that judgment in his own glory and that of his Father (Luke 9:26; Titus 2:13). The "exceeding joy" expresses the feeling with which it shall be given to the faithful to meet that day. The Revised Version, therefore, more correctly renders it, "And to set you before the presence of his glory without blemish in exceeding joy." Weak and vulnerable as they are, God's grace is mighty to do these two things for them - to protect them through time, and at the end of time to make them stand the scrutiny of the Judge like men in whom no blemish is discovered, and to whom that day brings exultant joy. To the only God our Saviour, through Jesus Christ our Lord, be glory, majesty, dominion, and power, before all time, and now, and for evermore (or, unto all the ages). So the Revised Version renders it, in accordance with the best-authenticated text. Documentary evidence renders it necessary to omit the "wise" in the "only wise God" of the Authorized Version, to insert the clause, "through our Lord Jesus Christ," to omit the "and" before the "majesty," and to adopt the extended expression of duration in the closing sentence. Thus the largest possible ascription of praise is made to God. It is the ascription of an honour which is confessed to belong to him eternally, before the world was, as well as in the present, and on to the eternity which is yet to enter. This is his in his character of Saviour - Preserver of them that are tending to fall, Redeemer of the weak and sinful; and, therefore, it is "through Jesus Christ."



To keep you from falling (φυλάξαι ὑμᾶς ἀπταίστους)

Lit., "to keep you without stumbling. Only here in New Testament. See the kindred word offend. Rev., stumble, James 2:10; James 3:2.

Exceeding joy (ἀγαλλιάσει)

See on 1 Peter 1:6.

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